WD My Cloud 2/3/4TBs how to speed things up  

Page 6 / 6 Prev
  RSS
Carlos
 Carlos
(@Carlos)
Guest

Hi,
I have found this issue several times:
If the unit is full (0 bytes free) it becomes unresponsive - every operation returns a network timeout.
Can't do a reboot, delete files, even list the content of the folders!
Only solution is to unplug the power supply, then plug it again - only then i can delete some files.

ReplyQuote
Posted : November 28, 2016 5:42 pm
Jacob
 Jacob
(@Jacob)
Guest

Do not open up port 22 to the wdmycloud, you are potentially exposing your entire lan to the internet if a the device is compromised (e.g. by using default ssh login details).

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 13, 2017 1:32 pm
Tomáš
 Tomáš
(@Tomáš)
Guest

Thank you for you advices! Finally setting (and starting) services helped me too!

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 5, 2017 3:07 pm
nick gibbs
 nick gibbs
(@nick gibbs)
Guest

Let's say on average I search for some type of tech info/resolution/troubleshooting twice a month, and multiply that by 20 years, we are looking at approaching 500 sessions of needing to go beyond the self evident or supplied help.
Some of those have lead to frustrating dead ends, some to a degree of resolution.
But this single post of yours has far and away surpassed them all in the positive effect it has had on my everyday life.
For 2 years I have accepted a 'bad buy' sluggish performance of the wd cloud. Having done everything i thought possible to improve matters, including new 6 cables etc, i just kind of got used to that as a working speed.
2 weeks ago the slug went to a virtual stop. We're talking seconds before the green bar even appeared let alone made it's deathly slow crawl across the folder redraw.
At the orig install and a couple of times I've tried to improve matters since, i've seen loads on checking cabling and routers, assigning static ip etc etc, but yours is the first that has detailed checking those essential services.
And it has made SUCH a difference.
It feels like the way computing was always meant to be.
Not just on the wd cloud though - system wide, network shares, local drive, camera - anything and everything wired.
Thank you so much.
You are man of the year in our house.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 2, 2017 6:33 am
Eli
 Eli
(@eli)
Member Admin

Nick Gibbs I'm glad that after 4 years this post is still helping people, WDMyCloud has been has been an awesome device for me, still using it daily.

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 5, 2017 10:18 pm
nick gibbs
 nick gibbs
(@nick gibbs)
Guest

I quite excitedly looked to see what our tech posts you had written, hoping you'd be some kind of genius guru i'd be looking for, but i see tech is one of the less frequent post topics.
doesn't stop you being a genius, just one who chooses not to write about it.
funny thing is that despite the huge improvement in speed, it is still showing as "Connected (Relay connection established), Port forwarding failed to connect on port 80 and port 443."
i thought the whole point was having a direct connection, so does this mean there is even greater potential speed, or should i just adopt a policy of 'if it ain't broke don't fix it'?
if this is the topic that the post ends saying you will be adding at some point, you'll know it has a ready and waiting audience.
cheers pal

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 6, 2017 8:10 am
Sam Gabriel
 Sam Gabriel
(@Sam Gabriel)
Guest

guys if u r having slow speeds over LAN or WLAN ((NOT INTERNET)) try to disable any Offload/Offloading option under your network adapter properties, you will find it easily just dig for it, i personally got amazing wlan speeds, my only problem is over the internet i got 20 Mbps internet and my NAS is downloading files at only 500kb/sec MAAAAX which is dead slow, any help appreciated...

ReplyQuote
Posted : July 7, 2017 7:46 pm
Neil F Liversidge
 Neil F Liversidge
(@Neil F Liversidge)
Guest

Sorry Eli but your ‘fix’ is technical overkill and came nowhere near solving the problem for me. We’ve used MyBook, MyBookLive and now MyCloud in our small business for the last 13 years. I’m a financial adviser, not a technical guy / network engineer. Our network was set up by a friend here in the UK, Paul, who’s a brit like me but who works at the US National Security Agency spy base at RAF Menwith Hill about 25 miles from our office. He’s a very good network guy!

Experience shows that MyBook / MyCloud storage devices last on average three years in normal use. We therefore always have at least one device hooked up in parallel on which to keep office copy backups with another device ready configured which is not live but which can be plugged in to become the new backup device once one of the existing devices goes kaput.

A week ago our gigabit switch and the MyBookLive we were using at the time both went kaput together and Paul was on holiday so I had to fix it myself. I replaced the MyBookLive with the
MyCloud device I had ready and waiting. Unfortunately I’d allowed the router to assign an IP address by DHCP without appreciating the importance of a static IP address which was how Paul had set up MyBook in the first place. The old MyBook device which previously acted as our server had a fixed IP address 192.168.1.55. Without a static IP address our network was slow and unusable. I worked out the problem after some googling and Youtubing and set the IP as 192.168.1.5. Mistake! Not only is it absolutely essential that your MyCloud device has a fixed IP addresses, IT IS ALSO ESSENTIAL THAT addresses be out of the range in which your router will dynamically assign IP addresses to your computers, VOIP phones, CCTV systems etc. With four pcs, five phones, two CCTV recorders and a router making 12 devices, and our router randomly and routinely assigning IP addresses up to 1.31, I advise not allocating any static IP address number lower than say 50. To be on the safe side, I changed the MyCloud IP address to 192.168.1.75. Now it’s perfect.

To assign a static IP address
1. Watch the video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuH7qopR6Rg and/or follow this procedure:

2. Identify the IP address the router has dynamically assigned to the device on its connection. Network scanner (football) is good for this purpose as per the example screenshot below where football has identified MyBook as 192.168.1.55 and MyCloud as 192.168.1.75.

3. In your Internet browser enter the IP address of the device to which you need to assign a static IP address. In this example we are using MyCloud which lives at 192.168.1.75. Entering that IP address in Chrome gets up the window below. It can take a while to load so be patient.

4. Click ‘settings’ in the top right hand corner to bring up the next screen as below:

5. Click ‘Network’ in the left hand menu to open the next screen as below:

6. The ‘Network Services’ buttons are the ones required but these usually take a few minutes to become live and usable. Again, be patient and wait for them! When they go live the screen below shows how they look, except that in the screenshot below ‘Static’ is blued out because a static IP address has already been assigned to MyCloud at the time of writing these notes. In reality if the device has just been connected ‘Static’ will be greyed out and ‘DHCP’ will be blue.

7. Click ‘details’ and note down the numbers for the Subnet mask, Gateway IP Address and DNS Server. These three values must NOT be changed. Usually these will be numbered as follows
IP Address 192.168.1.whatever
Subnet Mask / Netmask 255.255.255.0
Gateway IP Address 192.168.1.1 (Our Cisco server)
DNS Server 1 192.168.1.1 (Again, our Cisco Server)

8. Now click ‘Static’ to get through to the next screen and enter the new static IP address of your choice on the top line to replace whatever the router has dynamically assigned, so we gave it the suffix .75 as below:

9. Hit ‘Save’

10. Close the browser.

11. Run network scanner until the scanner shows up the new static IP address of the server you have just installed. Then map the network drives on every machine in the office using the same letters. We use:
N Neil
P Public
S Smartware
T Time Machine
For the way we work the drives must be mapped – Public especially – or our back office system will not work. The easiest way to map them is using the ‘football’ network scanner, left-clicking and then right-clicking to map the drives on the folders once they show up, but it can be done using File Explorer to find the folders in question.

I hope this helps and saves you all some time. I've just realised that the screenshots have not copied from my word doc so I'm attaching a JPEG of the whole thing. I stress that I am not a techy (obviously!) just a guy who likes finding simple workable solutions.

ReplyQuote
Posted : August 31, 2017 6:07 am
Page 6 / 6 Prev
Share: